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What does beauty have to do with faith? Everything!

In collaboration with community partners and local artists, Sanctuary hosts a monthly gallery installation that invites attendees to discover the shared human condition through the experience and inspiration of beauty.

These works of art not only transform our worship space each month, but they transform us as well.

Scroll down for some of our recent artists. Better yet, come and experience it for yourself!

Are you an Artist interested in showing at the Gallery @ Sanctuary? See our Artist Agreement and contact the office.

upcoming arts events

Apr
30
Mon
May Gallery Installation | Collage Artist – Rita Ortolino-Dioguardi @ The Gallery
Apr 30 – Jun 2 all-day

SpecialDates:

ARTChurch with the Artist – Sunday, May 6, 2018, 10:00am – 11:00 am

Reception and Reflections with the Artist – Friday, June 01, 2018, 7:00 pm

Rita Ortolino-Dioguardi, a talented collage and quilt artist, has been creating collage art since a young girl. What started as childhood art projects has bloomed into unique and colorful pieces of art. These stunning images are spontaneous creations. Her paper collages are created by ripping, not cutting, simple splashes of color from magazines and glossy advertisements and her quilts are born from simple scraps of material. Each piece of art is given a witty name that helps bring the creation to life.

Prints and cards of Rita’s work will be available for purchase during the installation.

www.ritadioguardi.com

Jun
1
Fri
Art Gallery Reception and Reflections | with Rita Ortolino-Dioguardi, Collage Artist
Jun 1 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Note Artist’s Dates:

ARTChurch with the Artist – Sunday, May 6, 2018, 10:00am – 11:00 am

Reception and Reflections with the Artist – Friday, June 01, 2018, 7:00 pm

Rita Ortolino-Dioguardi, a talented collage and quilt artist, has been creating collage art since a young girl. What started as childhood art projects has bloomed into unique and colorful pieces of art. These stunning images are spontaneous creations. Her paper collages are created by ripping, not cutting, simple splashes of color from magazines and glossy advertisements and her quilts are born from simple scraps of material. Each piece of art is given a witty name that helps bring the creation to life.

Prints and cards of Rita’s work will be available for purchase during the installation.

www.ritadioguardi.com

BYOB: Bring your own Beer, Wine or Soda to this month’s new art Installation.

Hear from the Artist(s) about their inspiration and process – and join the conversation about your own experience of their creativity.

Jun
10
Sun
ARTChurch | Sunday Circle
Jun 10 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am

This Month’s Artist is still creating!  Check back later for details about the artist and art being installed for this month’s ARTChurch!

About ARTChurch: Inspired by the rich spirituality and deep themes inherent in art, ARTChurch looks at scripture and liturgy through the lens of the art installed in the Gallery at Sanctuary UCC. On the second Sunday of each month, we experience the Holy—and the holy in each other—through the images, colors, themes and creative energies of the installation, the artist’s perspective and that which is seen by the observer.

Jun
15
Fri
Art Gallery Reception and Reflections | Artistic Spirit Series
Jun 15 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm

BYOB: Bring your own Beer, Wine or Soda to this month’s new art Installation.

Hear from the Artist(s) about their inspiration and process – and join the conversation about your own experience of their creativity.

Current and Recent Gallery Artists

“She’s been ripping paper since a child. Rita is a talented collage artist who works tirelessly with her hands and fingers ripping paper mostly from magazines. With glue in her left hand, she adheres each piece of paper to a blank paper surface.

Most times the image is already in her head. On occasion, she lightly sketches out a rough image soon to be the end results. She “paints” with paper and delights in flipping through magazines looking for jut the “right” color to begin and end her creation.

Preferring to work in the daylight, Rita works sitting on the edge of her bed in front of her easel. The Southwest natural light provides ample original light to illuminate the room. The world inside and outside are the impetus to her works of art. Some take weeks to complete while others are done within the hour. They are done when Rita decides their done.

Once completed, Rita brings the masterpiece downstairs to the kitchen table, laying the art work side upside down; she takes a rolling pin to the back of the art work to ensure a flat surface. Once that is done, the art work is turned upside and with her right hand she runs her fingers over the art to make sure each piece is securely adhered to the paper. If there is a loose piece now is the time to re-glue. Then with pen-in-hand, she applies her signature.

With a canister of high gloss spray, she takes the art to a well-ventilated space and sprays directly on the masterpiece. This seals the art, provides protection and gives the art an over-all finished look. She lets the art dry for a day or two.

Coming back to the finished product is the true test because it is then she realizes she has captured the image from her mind. Now it’s ready for the frame which Rita purchases and frames. Sometimes the frame creates the picture and sometimes not.

Her original art work is hung on every wall in her house that she shares with Jim and Madison, her Persian cat. She has two adult children. Her professional photographer takes an image of her art which is then magically reproduced on metal: Hence, original metal art prints.

Rita’s earrings are hand-made from her metal art prints as wells as magnets, calendars, mini desk collage metal creations and quilts. She is always bringing to life new creations.  Her website is filled with magical, mystical paper and cloth collage art always in progress. Rita can be contacted at:

Email: rita.dioguardi@tufts.edu
Website: www.ritadioguardi.com/


 

APRIL 2018: SMFA AT TUFTS

 

“The ‘Reflection’ show at Gallery at the Sanctuary brings together different works of six students from the graduate class of 2019 of the Smfa at Tufts. The show is intended to be the first, and will be followed by a second one in the following months by another group of students of the same class.

Students’ artworks reflect their individual concepts derived from their focus and thus, the themes of the works display a substantial variety. A range of medium takes place in the show including video, printmaking – specifically handmade paper, textile work, and painting which consists of techniques such as oil, acrylic paints, gouache, and ink.

Within this context, Paulina MacNeil, as a consumer, responds to the demanding production of capitalism in the fashion industry with her sewn patchwork textile pieces of tags. Willoughby Hastings works with conflicting visual symbols to explain personal experiences related to complicated social matters such as hierarchy or the memory of hierarchy within the society in terms of class and race.

Gisele Gardner’s painting, Rapturous, challenges the gray area between contrasting ideas and draws the audience into the field of uncertainty of what they see. Constructed through the material that created his memories of his grandfather and his grandfather’s space, Louis Meola’s handmade paper is an extension of his work which deals with memory and loss.

Lei Zong and Gulumhan Huma Yildirim’s works re-contextual or re-interpret the “classical” or the “traditional”. In this sense, Lei focuses on Flemish paintings and carries them to the present time by adding or subtracting from the setting and relocating the characteristics of the original work into new social settings. While Huma continues making traditional Turkish illumination artwork, she also seeks to re-interpret it by borrowing elements of contemporary art and merging them into her background.”


 

FEBRUARY 2018: ERIC SMITH

“The photos in this collection are meant to draw you into the natural world of New England, give you a glimpse into the lives of the wild animals that live there. An amazing variety of animals surround us; these photos will introduce you to many of them.

One of my passions is telling stories through my pictures. I love capturing that magic moment that expresses the animals’ character and transports you into their world. When I’m out in nature and I see these creatures, it revitalizes me; when I share my pictures I invite others into my experience.

I hope my photos bring the viewer into the scene and closer to these animals, to share in my joy of discovery. May you be as inspired as I am by these creatures – and may they appreciate them and love them as much as I do.”

Eric can be contacted at:

Email: esmithphoto@gmail.com
Phone: 781-507-6779
Website: esmithphoto.zenfolio.com/


 

NOVEMBER: ALYCE UNDERHILL | SEEING, SEEING DEEPLY…

…has always been important to me. My images are strongly influenced by the tranquility and sense of calm absorbed by spending time in the natural world… time among animals and light, rhythms and rain, stars and thunder.

If my pictures entreat the viewer to contemplate, reflect, to “see deeply” then I will feel I have participated in a natural flow of inspiration, vision and ultimately, image.

As an artist living on the North Shore of Massachusetts, I combine my passion for painting and photography, producing images similar to both, yet neither… striving to suffuse all with a quiet power.

Alyce can be contacted at:

Email: alyceunderhill@gmail.com
Phone: 978 994 2696
Website: www.alyceunderhillimagery.com

OCTOBER: CALEB COLE | OTHER PEOPLE’S CLOTHES…

When I am in public, I watch people going about their daily routines alone. I wonder about the lives they lead, wonder how they experience the world around them, and how they make meaning of it. I spend time inventing stories for them: narratives of isolation, of questioning and searching, of desire, and of confusion. The images in Other People’s Clothes are a product of my exploration of private moments of expectation, a visual expression of my experiences stepping into the shoes of the types of people I see daily.

Each constructed photograph in the series is a scene that begins with an outfit or piece of clothing (either bought, found, or borrowed), then a person that I imagine filling those clothes, and finally a location where that person can play out a silent moment alone. This moment is the time right before something changes, the holding in of a breath and waiting, the preparing of oneself for what is to come. Though I am the physical subject of these images, they are not traditional self-portraits. They are portraits of people I have never met but with whom I feel familiar, as well as documents of the process wherein I try on the transitional moments of others’ lives to better understand my own.

SEPTEMBER: LUCILDA DASSARDO COOPER | VEILED PRESENCE

Mesmerized by the sari-clad figure walking in the brilliance of a Delhi summer day,

I was enamored by the flowing movements of her dress in the breeze. This woman walking down the driveway, elegant and graceful, the servant of my housecleaner, took my breath away.

Like birds of brilliant plumage from poor rural villages to urbane metropolises, women of the Indian subcontinent establish their presence with their clothing, even when they are covered up, especially when they are covered up, as the features and personality become secondary to the statement of their dress.

Inspired by the bold designs and colors worn by the women, the Veiled Presence paintings are my attempt to come to terms with the painful reality of living in a society separated by gender—India—for three years.

From Kashmir to Kerala, I painted images of women from behind or covered up as a balm to my everyday bruises from being a woman in a male-dominated society where women need their father’s or husband’s permission and signature for all documents.

The placement of the figures on the canvas helps them to break out of one of the boundaries of their confinement, showing them from the top of the head to the hips.

Mostly worn in the desert regions, veils are very practical to keep the dust out.

Veils also keep prying eyes out, protecting the modesty of the women as they go    out in public.