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Apr
1
Sat
April Gallery Installation: Traditional, Contemporary and Folk Chinese Art
Apr 1 – Apr 27 all-day

Artists: Lianzhong Zhang,Ye Xinshi and Ming Guo

ARTChurch: Sun, April 2, 10:00 am

Reception and Reflections: Fri, April 17, 7:00 pm

Artist’s Statements:

Lianzhong Zhang

As a child, Lianzhong liked to draw in any medium. In the 1990s, he became seriously ill while living in China.  He quit his job and focused on resting. Later, he came to the U.S. to stay with his daughter. Interested in traditional Chinese painting, Lianzhong began study with a Michigan artist.  He would travel back to remote areas in Sichuan province such as Yun Nan and Anhui Guangxi. There he would be surrounded by mountains, rivers, and waterfalls that would rest in fog and clouds. It felt quiet and easy. Being there made Lianzhong happier and healthier. That fostered his desire to paint the scenery. He focused on one style landscape painting that used Chinese colored ink. “Painting today continues to bring that same sense of well-being. Doing this art makes me feel calm and is a main source of my health.”  He loves to see the lovely scenery like Grand Teton, Yellowstone, White Mountains… “I use a camera to get elements of a picture and then can compose whatever I choose—the paintings are not of one single scene—I create a composition in my mind.”

 

Xinshi Ye

Discussing his influences, Xinshi Ye refers to the 1950s when China was eager to adopt new forms of art stemming from Russia and the west. These different art forms straddle traditional realism and impressionist artforms. For over two thousand years, China maintains a longstanding history of traditional painting. Xinshi is expressing realism in this show, while adding an impressionistic focus into some paintings. When he moved to Massachusetts, Xinshi found the countryside so beautiful and now enjoys painting U.S. landscapes.  Due to China’s very large population and fast pace, he noticed a lack of quiet solitude and peace that he feels is more present in the states. There is a sense of connectedness and space that is appealing. Andrew Wyeth’s paintings provided another influence with the delicate nature of his work. Xinshi’s award-winning work has also led him to share his expertise and passion for art by teaching students at The Winchester School of Chinese Culture.

 

Ming Guo

China maintains a longstanding tradition of folk art. “Farmer’s wives” from the ancient Han Dynasty would take paper and do similar kinds of folk art with available materials. Inspired by those customs, current needlework reflects the older style that has now become more westernized. Ming has done this work in China and now continues in the states. She sees this work in her neighborhood, and remains inspired to produce her needle art. She also has found her own personal style in watercolor paintings, perhaps influenced by her husband, Xinshi Ye.

 

Apr
24
Mon
Ministry Center Closed
Apr 24 all-day
Apr
25
Tue
Sanctuary Office and Gallery Open
Apr 25 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Rev. Lambert’s Open Office Hours
Apr 25 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Apr
26
Wed
Yoga class
Apr 26 @ 10:00 am – 11:15 am
Sanctuary Office and Gallery Open
Apr 26 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Apr
27
Thu
Sanctuary Office and Gallery Open
Apr 27 @ 11:00 am – 6:00 pm
Rev. Lambert’s Open Office Hours
Apr 27 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm
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